TAKE ACTION

Whether it is the congressional representative who represents the district you live in or the senator who represents the state you live in, they are always eager to hear from you, their constituent, on the issues that trouble you. Help us make your lawmakers aware of the Green Card backlog issues and the opportunity we have in front of us to fix it.

Call Your Representative

When you call, a staffer will answer. Introduce yourself by telling your name and the town you live in. Mention that you are calling regarding the current bill in the House and Senate, H.R.392 (in the House of Representatives) and S.281 (in the Senate). Briefly explain the issue (see talking points below), and then request the staffer to bring this to the lawmaker's attention and request them to consider signing on to/co-sponsor the bill.

Looking for some talking points? See Below ⇓

Meet Your Representative

When you call to schedule a meeting, a staffer will answer. Introduce yourself by telling your name and the town you live in. Mention that you are calling to schedule a meeting with the lawmaker. You can state that the meeting is regarding the current bill in the House and Senate, H.R.392 (in the House of Representatives) and S.281 (in the Senate). You may get a meeting with the lawmaker or one of their staffers who help them with immigration and legislative matters. During the meeting, briefly explain the issue (see talking points below), and then request the staffer to bring this to the lawmaker's attention and request them to consider signing on to/co-sponsor the bill.

Ensure to download, print, and carry copies of the information packet to the appointment. Hand this packet to the staffer just so that they have a good amount of information when they start reviewing your request. 

Looking for some talking points? See Below ⇓

Talking Points

The Issue:

  • More than 1.5 million legal high-skilled immigrants and their families are affected by this issue.
  • While they have been living in the United States for the last 10 years legally, and continue to make several contributions to the economy and society, they will have to wait 40-70+ years to get their green cards, primarily because they originated from India.
  • Applicants with the same skillset, but from most of the other countries, in the same employment-based category get their green cards within 6 months of applying.
  • Although most of the applicants hold advanced degrees from universities in the United States, they cannot change roles, accept promotions, or start their own ventures to create American jobs.
  • Children, US-born or Indian-born, are at risk of being displaced because the parents are one job loss away from being forced to leave the country.
  • Indian-born children have no safety net or resident benefits when it comes to higher education or joining the workforce. An alphabet soup of visas and uncertainty is waiting for them as soon as they graduate from high school, all this after living in the country legally for 15+ years.

The Opportunity:

  • The bills, H.R.392 and S.281, aim to eliminate country-based quotas within the employment-based immigration system, without increasing the immigration numbers.
  • It establishes a fair first-come first-serve system that no longer judges applicants by the country of their birth.
  • H.R.392, in the House of Representatives, has broad bi-partisan support, and has 230+ co-sponsors.